Archive for January, 2010

Sacred Geometry and SourcePoint

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The practices of SourcePoint are founded on the perception that we live in a universe of order, balance, harmony and flow. For millennia, philosophers, mathematicians, magicians and healers have explored the realm of sacred geometry and demonstrated this universe of order in thousands of fascinating ways. Now some modern physicists are beginning to suspect this order may permeate the quantum dimension.

In SourcePoint Therapy we work with sacred geometry through the configurations formed by the Diamond and Golden Rectangle Points, and the Navel Point.

In the video I’ve posted, Charles Gilchrist, an artist who has worked extensively with sacred geometry, describes a repeating pattern in one of his paintings and speaks of the single point that is the center of the pattern:

“This center is everywhere and nowhere, beyond time, and that center can move to any part of this grid and it will be the same center and the same potentials will come out of that same center. When you are experiencing something that that does transcend time it is easy to step out of yourself and get a clear view of where you’ve been and where you are going. Time has a strange way of flexing back and forth in the same moment. No matter where you go, there you are, in the same center, the center of the universe.”

Watching this artist work helped me to understand more about what we are doing when we practice SourcePoint. If you think of the Diamond Points and imagine the diamond shape around the body, and then that every point connects to another similar configuration and another, repeating endlessly, you have a grid, formed by infinite single points, each one of which is, in the dimensions beyond space and time, “the center of the universe.” Through the points, we connect to Source. Each point contains the whole, and is a doorway from multiplicity to unity, or Source. This is the “bindu” of the Hindu tradition.

Charles Gilchrist says that when drawing the mandala he uses pencil, compass and straight edge as his only tools. He uses exact geometric proportions to create the grid of his mandala, but his use of color is intuitive. He senses what colors feel right. This is a metaphor for what we do in SourcePoint: the points and other configurations provide a precise grid that connects to that larger grid, the blueprint. With the container of this grid, there is room for “color,” for intuition and sensing, as we work with the blockages and follow what the scan tells us.

The artist refers to the creation of mandala as a healing ritual and says, “No healing can happen unless ritual is involved.” SourcePoint Therapy could perhaps be called a contemporary ritual to support health, tied to no particular culture or tradition, invoking no deities or spirits, just invoking the underlying order, balance, harmony and flow of the universal energy. Every time we hold the points, we’re creating a wonderfully simple mandala reflecting the cosmic order of the Blueprint.

© 2010 Donna Thomson and Bob Schrei

“Remembered Wellness”

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Photograph by Josh Schrei The Himalayas

Before Andrew Weil and Bruce Lipton, there was Herbert Benson, MD. He is the author of the fascinating book Timeless Healing: the Power and Biology of Belief, first published in 1995. Dr. Benson was ahead of his time in researching the effect of the mind on healing. His book is full of scientific studies on what is commonly called “the placebo effect.” He prefers to call it “remembered wellness” and I find this term very compatible with the principles of SourcePoint.

“Remembered wellness” is what happens when you connect to the blueprint. The body is recovering its memory of wholeness and completeness, of innate order, balance, harmony and flow. When you work with the points of SourcePoint Therapy, you are reminding the body of something it already knows.

Dr. Benson prescribes “the relaxation response” as a means of experiencing that remembered wellness. This is essentially a meditative technique to quiet the mind and connect with healing energies. As you know if you have experienced SourcePoint, a treatment can easily bring you to that place of deep relaxation.

There are other ways to evoke this remembered wellness that I have found through my own healing and work with other people. You can work with the conscious mind to evoke that memory. It’s best to work with a relative simple and minor injury to start with. It’s easier in that instance to let go of old belief systems and use the mind to alleviate the effect of the injury and support the process of the body’s natural self- healing.

As anyone who works with trauma knows, moments of trauma, even if they are minor, can get stuck in the body-mind. The flow of life is moving along and then something happens that disrupts that flow and that event gets frozen in time, in the memory. Instead of staying stuck in that moment, you can use your imagination, which is a powerful tool for healing. You can imagine the past differently to replace the memory of injury with a memory of wellness.

Let’s say I sprain an ankle, and I remember the principles and practices of SourcePoint. I immediately place my hands gently on my ankle, imagine the Diamond Points, breathe calmly and regularly, being aware of the breath, and repeat the words source, grounding, activation, transformation, as I visualize the points. Of course, if there’s someone around to hold the points for me, that’s even better.

Then I use my imagination to replay the event in my mind. I see myself walking along, coming to the place where the injury occurred, and instead of seeing the fall, I imagine myself continuing to walk right through that space and going on with my day. I feel myself doing that. At the level of space-time I am returning to the location of the injury, to the time of the injury, and seeing it differently, allowing the flow to progress along an alternative probability path, not getting stuck in the injury. As I imagine this, I am giving the body a deep message of how it was before the injury, before the wound, before the moment where the flow of health and wellness was disrupted.

I have used this approach frequently. It isn’t denial. It’s imagining a different outcome of a particular moment in time and letting my body experience that alternative. Studies have shown that the body reacts to imagination and visualization as it does to an actual event. In one study, some participants went to the gym and worked out; others did “virtual workouts” mentally. Those who went to the gym had a 30% muscle increase. Those who stayed home and did it mentally had a 13.5% increase, or almost half as much!

We aren’t looking to replace treatment at the physical level with this approach. We are looking to support the body in its healing, to bring in another level of support.Injuries need physical attention first!

After I imagine, I do the Guardian Points and invoke the guardians of the body to help me heal. The Diamond Points and Guardian Points in these acute situations for me are a kind of “energy first aid.”

I think we have barely tapped the surface of what Dr. Benson calls “timeless healing.” The potential of the healing power that comes from connecting to that original state of wellness, the blueprint for human health, we are really only beginning to discover and explore.

© 2010 Donna Thomson and Bob Schrei

Acceleration

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In the last post I wrote about how the practice of energy work requires a radical re-definition of self. I think it may also require a redefinition of time, beginning with an exploration of time and how it functions both in healing and in this experience of being embodied.

Everyone I talk to has a sense of time accelerating, moving faster. I was always told that would happen as I got older, but this perception now seems to be across the board, among all age groups. There is “no” time, there is never enough time, time seems to go faster and faster. It is harder to “be in the present moment” perhaps because the present moment seems to be getting shorter all the time. Thousands, or even just hundreds, of years ago time was more defined by daily and seasonal rhythms. Information traveled slowly. Moving through distance took a lot of time, and information traveled physically. Now the future arrives before we even have time to take a breath, and the past is gone as quickly as the next update arrives on our computer. Information travels instantly from one place to another.

If we look at human history, it’s intimately tied into a process of acceleration, to shifts in our experience of time: the first time a human being mounted a horse that galloped away, the invention of the steam engine and the coming of the trains, the airplane, the telegraph, the internet. It’s a constant acceleration. I am not bemoaning this, or wishing we could return to a “slower” time or more natural rhythm. That would be nice, perhaps, but it isn’t going to happen. I think health in the 21st century has a lot to do with what Tara Brach has called “Radical Acceptance.” I’m neither lauding the acceleration of our lives as progress, nor judging it as bad and unhealthy, just stating it as a fact, and something that we have to adjust to and work with. In our daily lives, to long for more time to come into balance is natural; but the reality is, how do we keep our balance in a rapidly accelerating world?

I’ve always felt that meditative time is different than ordinary time. A few moments of tuning into the rhythm of my breath, visualizing the Diamond Points around me, closing my eyes and feeling the pulse of energy within me, moves me out of the realm of ordinary time and space, into ”¦what? I can call it the present moment, I can call it timelessness, I could describe it many ways. Whatever it is, it’s very calming and restorative.

That experience leads me to reflect that this is also what we do when we connect with the blueprint in SourcePoint Therapy. The dimension of consciousness/energy in which the blueprint arises is, I think, the ultimate “present moment,” not eternal, but timeless, not fixed by our notions of past, present and future. Energy blocks are very much tied up with time. Our body holds memories of things that happened in the “past.” We are afraid of our illness or pain recurring in the “future” even as we feel momentarily better in the “present.” How to move the body out of that paradigm into an essential experience of wellness that is not defined by our past experience or our fears of the future? How to open up to that timeless information and just receive it? This reflection leads us to understand how the term “therapy” is appropriate for our particular form of energy work. SourcePoint is therapeutic in the same way that meditation can be said to be therapeutic. SourcePoint is a particular method for bringing greater order, balance, harmony and flow to the mind, body and spirit. It isn’t treating disease. It’s a way to support the natural flow of energy present in a balanced system by connecting us to the very Source of our being.

For now, I leave you to reflect on your perception of time and how it can create blocked energy, and how time perhaps affects our healing process. Next week, further thoughts and some specific methods I’ve explored for myself in working with time from the perspective of energy. And, just below, a meditation that works with the space between, finding those moments of timelessness, neither past, present, or future, in the midst of a busy life.

© 2010 Donna Thomson and Bob Schrei

Embodiment

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Photograph by Josh Schrei

Photograph by Josh Schrei

Often in bodywork and movement work and in many self-help books, the instruction to “be more fully in the body” is a common one. It will bring a greater health, and is often considered a sign of health, to “be in your body.” What we need, though, in order to follow this instruction effectively, is an exploration of what this body is. No one thinks of the body as something requiring definition.

In SourcePoint, when we refer to “the body,” we do not make a distinction between what is called the “energy body” and the “physical body.” We are looking at the body as an energetic structure. The physical form is a manifestation of energetic structure, and it is not separate from the energetic structure. Physicality is energy and what we call the “energy body” is a subtle form of physicality.

In various esoteric traditions different names are given to the energy bodies healers and clairvoyants have perceived in relationship to the physical body. There’s the etheric, the astral, the causal, the light body, and so on. For our purposes we would simply say there many different aspects of the energy body, including what is usually called the physical body. It is all “the body.” It’s all you.

“The body” does not end with its apparent physical boundaries. The individual body merges into greater dimensions of the universal energy field. It can be useful to experience a boundary around oneself, but that should be experienced as a good 6 to 18 inches or more out from what is commonly called the physical body. The Diamond Points represent that boundary, that merging point.

So to be fully embodied does not mean that your consciousness is grounded only in the “physical body.” While people may sometimes experience being disconnected from the physical body, it is even more common for people to be stuck in their perception of the physical body as who they are, with no awareness of their larger energy body. Sometimes when people feel disconnected from the physical body, it simply means that for whatever reason, their consciousness is dwelling more in the larger energy body. To be fully in the body would be to be aware of and dwell in the full range of what the body is, all the aspects of its energy, not only the one we describe as physical. A great many of the issues around “being in the body” are created by the fundamental belief in the split between soul, mind, and body. It’s all body, it’s all mind, it’s all soul. How simple. How complicated.

The true practice of energy work requires a radical redefinition of self and body. As a practitioner, if you expand your perception of the body, then you will perceive those you work with as amazing, complex patterns of energy, and as you perceive that, you will communicate that information to their bodies through your work; that reminder to the physical body/mind currently caught in its learned perception of itself.

Your work will say to that body: This is what you are. This is your nature. You are energy.

© 2010 Donna Thomson and Bob Schrei

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